Blyny
Bliny (so-called pancakes or crepes) are a kind of dish which is cooked on different occasions.

Russians eat them at different times of the day as a dessert, snack, or even the main course.

Bliny are served with sour creme, honey, salmon, caviar, and many other ingredients. Bliny are rather big (the size of the plate), so don't confuse them with small and thick oladyi (another kind of pancakes).

Bliny are especially popular on Maslenitsa ( Butterweek – a week before the Lent). Blinis are a symbol of the sun, which is represented not only in the shape but also in the warmth you feel on a cold day. There are millions of recipes of bliny. But we would like to offer you one example.
Sirniki
Sirniki is a popular dish in Russian and Ukrainian cuisine. They are small pancakes made of cottage cheese (or farmer cheese as it's known in America). We usually eat them for breakfast or as a dessert served with jam, sour cream.

The name "sirniki" derives from the word "sir" which means "cheese" in Russian but also means "cottage cheese" in the Ukrainian. Cottage cheese is highly popular in our country.

The main ingredients are cottage cheese, eggs, and flour but we often cook sweet sirniki with raisins or dried apricots. It's very tasty to cook them with bananas. During your Moscow tours, you'll most likely find sirniki served for breakfast n your hotel.ду, погрузим в грузовик.
Pelmeni
Pelmeni or meat dumplings are extremely popular in Russia, but historically this dish has an eastern origin. The word "pelmeni" is derived from two words of the Finno-Ugric language. Ancient men of Perm and Udmurtia called them "pelnyan" or "bread ears".

Frozen meat dumplings are ideal for the cold climate. They can be perfectly preserved through the winter without losing their characteristics, and meat, hidden in the dough, does not attract wild animals.

Traditional Ural pelmeni are stuffed with three kinds of meat - beef, lamb, or pork.

But you can come across lots of other meat or fish fillings. In Siberia pelmeni are even cooked with the bear meat.

Varenniki
Varenniki are dumpling similar to pelmeni but they're usually stuffed with cheese, mashed potatoes, cabbage, meat, hard-boiled eggs or different fruits (cherry or plump).


Pirog
Pirog is a big Russian pie that might have a savory or sweet filling.

There is a great number of pirog recipes.

Besides a huge variety of dough – leavenous, puff, or sponge - there are also different types of pirogs, such as open (with filling on the top), closed (with filling inside) or layered.

Some kinds of pirogs are specially prepared for certain celebrations, such as matchmaking or a wake ceremony. Traditionally, in Russia, pirog was a distinguishing characteristic of a good housewife.


Borscht
Borscht is a soup originally coming from the Ukrainian cuisine but now equally popular in Russia. It has a distinctive reddish-purple color because it’s cooked with beetroot and tomatoes. In Russia borsch is always served hot.

Borscht was the favorite soup of the emperors Catherine the Great and Alexander II. It was loved by the writer Gogol. Even ballerina Anna Pavlova was fond of this high-calorie soup served with goose.

There are a lot of different kinds of borscht recipes. The main ingredient of this soup is beets. Traditional borscht is cooked with meat or possibly poultry, but you can also find vegetarian versions of this soup. The other vegetables include cabbage, carrots, potatoes, onions, and tomatoes, and in some regions, it might also include kidney beans, apples, turnips, vegetable marrows. Borscht is traditionally spiced with garlic, herbs and sour cream.


Solyanka
Solyanka is a thick, piquant soup popular in Russian and Ukrainian cuisine. It can be cooked with meat, fish, or mushrooms, other ingredients include olives, pickled cucumbers with brine, cabbage, potatoe, sour cream and dill.

Solanka was mentioned for the first time in the 15th century culinary books. The soup was especially popular among Russian peasants; it was very nourishing, served as the first and the second course. The think soup with pickles appeared a great snack for vodka.

The soup eaten together with vodka helped to drink a lot and not to get drunk. Solyanka was also often served in the morning; its second unofficial name was a "hangover" soup. Solanka was not so popular in aristocratic society, it was considered unworthy of the noble table and loved only by the villagers. Only in the 19th century, the soup was recognized by other parts of society.


Herring under the fur coat
Herring under the fur coat - is a traditional Russian salad. It's loved in Russia but might appear a rather weird dish to a foreigners. The salad has several layers: salted herring is covered with chopped onions, potatoes, carrots, beet roots and dressed with mayonnaise.

There is an interesting legend of the merchant, Anastas Bogomilov, who created this salad to save his restaurants from drunken fights. It happened in 1918 when the proletariat celebrated the New Year with a dish prepared by the cook Aristarchus Prokoptsev and named SH.U.B.A ('shuba' means "fur coat" in Russian, but it was also an acronym for "to Chauvinism and Decline (in Russian "Upadok") - Boycott and Anathema").

Later this salad became known as "herring under a fur coat". Red beet salad symbolized the red flag of the Revolution whereas herring and potatoes were a classic proletarian appetizer. This salad was very filling and as a result, guests did not get drunk quickly. However, they say that the salad "herring under a fur coat" began to appear on Soviet tables in the second half of the 60s of the 20th century but became popular a bit later. The traditional salad consists of chopped grated boiled vegetables (beets, carrots, potatoes), salted herring fillet, and mayonnaise sauce. This classical New Year salad was one of four mandatory things on the feast table: champagne, tangerines, Olivier salad and herring under the fur coat.



Sbiten
Herring under the fur coat - is a traditional Russian salad. It's loved in Russia but might appear a rather weird dish to a foreigners. The salad has several layers: salted herring is covered with chopped onions, potatoes, carrots, beet roots and dressed with mayonnaise.

There is an interesting legend of the merchant, Anastas Bogomilov, who created this salad to save his restaurants from drunken fights. It happened in 1918 when the proletariat celebrated the New Year with a dish prepared by the cook Aristarchus Prokoptsev and named SH.U.B.A ('shuba' means "fur coat" in Russian, but it was also an acronym for "to Chauvinism and Decline (in Russian "Upadok") - Boycott and Anathema").

Later this salad became known as "herring under a fur coat". Red beet salad symbolized the red flag of the Revolution whereas herring and potatoes were a classic proletarian appetizer. This salad was very filling and as a result, guests did not get drunk quickly. However, they say that the salad "herring under a fur coat" began to appear on Soviet tables in the second half of the 60s of the 20th century but became popular a bit later. The traditional salad consists of chopped grated boiled vegetables (beets, carrots, potatoes), salted herring fillet, and mayonnaise sauce. This classical New Year salad was one of four mandatory things on the feast table: champagne, tangerines, Olivier salad and herring under the fur coat.